Association between smoking cessation and alterations in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). A Follow-Up Study from a Greek Tobacco Cessation Clinic

Document Type : Original Article

Authors

1 Department of Biochemistry, Sismanogleio Hospital, Athens, Greece

2 Pulmonology Department, Laiko General Hospital, Athens, Greece

3 Pulmonology Department, Sismanogleio Hospital, Athens, Greece

4 1. Department of Propedeutic Surgery, Laiko General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece 2. N.S. Christeas Laboratory of Experimental Surgery and Surgical Research, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece

5 First Department of Internal Medicine, Laiko General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece

6 First Department of Propedeutic Internal Medicine, Laiko General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece

7 Department of Thoracic Surgery, Agios Savvas Hospital, Athens, Greece

8 Department of Cytology, Mitera Hospital, Athens, Greece

10.22122/ahj.2022.91965

Abstract

Background: Cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of several diseases such as malignancies, pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. Smoking cessation is now supported by both behavioral counseling and medical pharmacotherapy and is the only effective approach for slowing down an accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Our study aims to examine changes in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after smoking cessation for smokers attending our smoking cessation clinic their correlation to smokers’ demographic characteristics.
Methods: 114 smokers (48 males and 66 females), with a mean age of 48.36±10.49 years, were enrolled. They were classified in 4 groups, according to their age; <40 years (Group Α), 41-50 years (Group Β), 51-60 years (Group C), >60 years (Group D) and underwent Spirometry on the 1st day of visit, one month (2nd visit) and, 3 months later (3rd visit).
Findings: Statistically significant increase in FEV1 values at the 2nd and 3rd visit compared to the 1st visit was observed in smokers who quit smoking in Group Α, B and C (p<0.05). In addition, a statistically significant decrease in FEV1 values at the 2nd and 3rd visit compared to the 1st visit was noticed in smokers who continued smoking in Group B, C and D (p<0.05).
Conclusion: Smoking cessation achieved through smoking cessation support led to the improvement of FEV1 values within 3 months. The greatest benefit was observed in smokers under the age of 60. 

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