Kerman University of Medical Sciences

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 Professor, Neuroscience Research Center, Neuropharmacology Institute AND Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

2 Psychiatrist, Neuroscience Research Center, Neuropharmacology Institute AND Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

3 PhD Student, HIV/STI Surveillance Research Center AND WHO Collaborating Center for HIV Surveillance, Institute for Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

4 Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Ir

5 Associate Professor, Neuroscience Research Center, Neuropharmacology Institute AND Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

Abstract

Background: Buprenorphine sublingual tablets are now available in Iran for opioid detoxification in clinics. Aim of the present study was to compare the efficiency of buprenorphine with buprenorphine/naloxone in short-term detoxification in a group of Iranian male opioid-dependent patients.
Methods:A double-blind trial was carried out on a group of male opioid dependent patients in a psychiatric hospital in Kerman, Iran, during year 2017. A group of 100 men who met the diagnostic criteria for opiate dependence were included in the study from individuals who had referred for detoxification. They were allocated to the two groups receiving either buprenorphine (n = 51) or buprenorphine/naloxone (n = 49). Severity of withdrawal symptoms and signs were evaluated by Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS) and Adjective Rating Scale for Withdrawal (ARSW).
Findings: The mean scores of COWS and ARSW in the two groups treated with buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone significantly reduced from the first day to the fifth day of detoxification
(P < 0.050). Moreover, there was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of objective and subjective symptom reduction (P > 0.050).
Conclusion: Buprenorphine/naloxone is as effective as buprenorphine in controlling opiate withdrawal symptoms.

Keywords

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